The Constitution of the United States – Part 20

The Constitution of the United States – Part 20

21st Amendment – Ending Prohibition!

The 21st amendment to the United States Constitution was passed by Congress on February 20, 1933, and was ratified by the states, thereby taking effect on December 5, 1933. Interestingly, when Congress passes an amendment and requests ratification from the states, the individual state legislatures vote on the amendment, not the people.
However, this time – for the first time ever, Congress stipulated that “conventions of states” should vote on the amendment. Since Prohibition was so unpopular by 1933, the Congress figured that they would pass the amendment, fearing that state legislatures who were pro-prohibition would try and defeat the amendment. The 21st amendment brought an end to the 13 year “Great Experiment” that America was under. ~ www.albany.edu
When the newly-elected President Roosevelt asked Congress to modify the Volstead Act and thereby “turn on the spigots” for 3.2 percent beer, the public was so elated that 30,000 people stormed an Anheuser Busch motorcade of beer-laden trucks twenty blocks long.
“It would be a disservice to say that the 18th Amendment was completely ineffective. It would also be a disservice to say that the 18th Amendment caused the lawlessness embodied by people like Al Capone. During the Prohibition Era, alcohol consumption (measured in gallons of ethanol consumed) dropped to an average of less than a gallon per person per year, down from two and a half gallons in 1915. While most Americans respected the law and were in favor of the law, the shine of “dry” began to wear off, especially as the Great Depression set in.” www.usconstitutiononline.com
“A movement began to form to repeal the 18th Amendment because the prohibition of alcohol was seen as an affront to personal liberty, pushed on the nation by religious moralists. (Sound familiar today?) The state and local governments also needed the revenue, so “wet” legislators were elected to replace the “dry” ones from two decades earlier.” www.usconstitutiononline.com
The repeal of the 18th amendment was the first time an amendment had been repealed by another in our history.  Let’s raise a glass to the 21st!

"Peace is that brief glorious moment in history when everybody stands around reloading" ~ Thomas Jefferson